Thursday, July 8, 2010

Small Town and Uniqueness

I did not mention it after the wool festival, but I had two skeins of kid mohair that were stolen. I was sick about it and prayed that the thief did not profit. This past weekend, one of my friends found them selling at a yard sale for $5 each. They were huge skeins 281 yards and 300 yards weighing 4.4 and 4.8 ounces. Total value was $155 and a week of work, never mind the cost of feeding the animals to raise it. My friend had written to tell me that she had found a "steal" and she recognized them immediately as mine and said they must not have known what they had to be selling it so cheap. I am sure that their conscience was bothering them. They were indeed a "steal."

I have learned a few things from this.

Tucson is a small town and what you do can come back to haunt you. Whoever stole the yarn was never going to be able to use it here in Tucson, because most knitters and crocheters recognize my yarns at first sight. No matter how hard other fiber artists try, they are never going to be able to duplicate my process. I am a freeform artist and my yarns are produced in the same manner. I am not afraid of competition! So, anyone using my yarns or buying any of my finished goods is sure to get noticed.

I have been photographing my yarns for quite a while and these two had been listed on my eshop, so I did not have to look around to discover the cost, yardage, etc. I have listed them here for my friend's use. I don't want it back, because I have already written them off and I would just feel sick again, if I had to look at them. It is nice that she recognized them and was willing to send me a photo. Now I have "the rest of the story" and can truly let it go.

2 comments:

Pat Riesenburger said...

Karma is a bitch....you are good to let it go as the universe has a way of taking care of these things!

Alan said...

If I knew where my stolen property had ended up, I would have a hard time NOT saying something to the thief. There's no excuse for that type of theft. Stealing to survive is almost forgivable; stealing for greed is not.